Herb Garden Help

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Herb Garden Help

Postby Jesse on Sat Dec 27, 2008 6:10 pm

Anyone got any good herb garden planting tips? Since we're finally home for good, we want to plant an herb garden in the back yard. We've got a good amount of space available for use and with another week off, the time to mess around in the yard. Is it too early to be doing anything now? I've seen some OK web sites that give some guidance, but I'm sure yall can give me way more info. We're interested in mint, cilantro, basil, oregano, chives, rosemary, thyme, tarragon and parsley. At least thats all I can think of now. Any input?
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Re: Herb Garden Help

Postby Mrs. Fury on Sat Dec 27, 2008 6:17 pm

Hi! I'll tell you what I know from my own experience. Basil cannot take the cold, at all. I've got rosemary, oregano, chives & mint that are outside full time and they are all fine going on 3+ years. I had thyme last year but it died when it got cold. I doubt you should plant now, wait until Spring. If you plant basil be prepared. The more you trim it the more it will make. You probably only need one or 2 plants.
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Re: Herb Garden Help

Postby Low-N-Slow on Sat Dec 27, 2008 6:42 pm

Of those mentioned, I would probably not bother with the cilantro. It's hard to germinate, and I don't usually see starts of it at the nurseries in the spring. For 89 cents for a big bunch at the grocery, it's not worth the trouble.

If you want to grow any of the others from seed yourself, you can start indoors in mid-January, and be ready to move outdoors the end of February, after which danger of frost should be past. Or you can just buy starts around that time instead.

Basil is indeed easy. Two plants usually last me all season, with plenty to spare and share. Basil is programmed to flower after a stalk produces six pairs of leaves. Before it does, cut it back just above the bottom or next-to bottom pair, and it will fork in two from right below the cut. Keep up with it, and you will have a nice bushy plant with multiple opportunities to harvest for use each week, and also keep the supply going. My two bushes last year ended up over three feet high, and about 30" in diameter.

Chives are easy, too. I like the garlic chives.

Also consider jalapenos. Fairly easy to grow, and one plant there is usually enough, too-- two at most, and they don't take up very much room.
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Re: Herb Garden Help

Postby buzd on Sun Dec 28, 2008 12:30 am

Low-N-Slow wrote:Of those mentioned, I would probably not bother with the cilantro. It's hard to germinate, and I don't usually see starts of it at the nurseries in the spring. For 89 cents for a big bunch at the grocery, it's not worth the trouble.


Vietnemese cilantro is very easy to grow. I don't think it's actually in the cilantro family, but the flavor is very similar, and it's easy to grow. I got my plant at the farmer's market.

My parsley is doing very well right now (so is my basil, actually).
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Re: Herb Garden Help

Postby cstoehr on Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:15 pm

I have had my rosemary so long it is a small "tree". It really is fragrant and although I could tame it, I am letting it do its thing. I think it is over 5 years old and was a transplant when I got it.
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